Tag Archive | Japan

Tokyo Arcade 2012

TOKYO_ARCADE_2012

 

Tokyo-Go-Go presents a pop-up exhibition featuring a collection of his video game inspired art, stickers and toys. Ultimately… a bunch a bright, fun character driven work. The concept behind Tokyo Arcade 2012 is to round off the year with a bang and offer, for a short period of time, a multitude of ready-to-hang artwork at affordable prices that would add an element of fun to any space, or perhaps make for a pretty awesome, unique gift. The show is only up for 5 days and collection will take place thereafter.

Venue – Mooki Noodle Bar
190 Brand Road Glenwood Durban

Opens – 18h00 – 22h00

Cash Bar and Dining

Laser Cut Sushi

Japan-based ad agency I&S BBDO puts a new spin on a centuries old Japanese delicacy. In an effort to reignite the seaweed-eating community for their client, the series of laser-cut seaweed known as Design NORI offers a stylized meal to entice consumers. By taking traditional seaweed and cutting intricate patterns into them, each sushi roll created with the edible square is turned into a work of art.

The idea for this inventive food design stemmed from the decline in business for Hiroyuki Umino, who owns a seaweed wholesale and retail store in Ibaraki Prefecture called Umino Seaweed Shop, since the destructive tsunami hit Japan in 2011. Each design scheme is cut into the nori (the Japanese word for the seaweed paper most commonly used for sushi), which needs to be thick because Umino says that thin seaweed is too weak to handle the meticulous incisions. Each design is a separate symbolic representation of positivity—good fortune, happiness, longevity, etc.

Although Design NORI is not yet available for mass distribution or online sale, it is currently on display as part of the KATAGAMI Style – Paper Stencils and Japonisme exhibition atMitsubishi Ichigokan Museum in Tokyo until May 27, 2012.

Bonsai Tree Houses

 

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here

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Takanori Aiba was born in 1953 in Yokohama, Japan. He studied Japanese traditional textiles and dyed clothing at Tokyo Zokei University. He built his first career as a freelance maze illustrator from 1978. His maze works were serialized in “POPYE”, a Japanese fashion magazine for 10 years. He then founded his own company,”Graphics and Designing Inc.”, in 1981. He expanded the range of his career to become a concept maker and art director for architectural spaces. Since, 2003, he has put his mind to work creating three dimensional art works which combine his knowledge and experience of both maze illustration and architecture. On September, 2010, his solo exhibition, “Adventures of the Eyes” was held at Kakiden Gallery, Tokyo Japan.

A Mystery Table

What initially appears to be a smooth wooden tabletop unfolds to reveal numerous hidden storage compartments in varying shapes and sizes. Hinged cupboards, sliding drawers and shifting panels join together like a seamless puzzle arranged with trademark Japanese precision. Designed by Naoki Hirakoso, and Takmitsu Kitahara

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Naoki Hirakoso was born in Tokyo, Japan in 1974. Graduated from Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music. After working at Living Design Center from 2000 to 2002.
Moved to Milan Italy in 2004. Established GIBA in Milan. Backed to Japan in 2006 Aug. Now based in Tokyo.

Skateboard Art by Haroshi

Haroshi makes his art pieces recycling old used skateboards. His creations are born through styles such as wooden mosaic, dots, and pixels; where each element, either cut out in different shapes or kept in their original form, are connected in different styles, and shaven into the form of the final art piece. Haroshi became infatuated with skateboarding in his early teens, and is still a passionate skater at present. He knows thoroughly all the parts of the skateboard deck, such as the shape, concave, truck, and wheels. He often feels attached to trucks with the shaft visible, goes around picking up and collecting broken skateboard parts, and feels reluctant to throw away crashed skateboards. It’s only natural that he began to make art pieces (i.e. recycling) by using skateboards. To Haroshi, his art pieces are equal to his skateboards, and that means they are his life itself. They’re his communication tool with both himself, and the outside world.

The most important style of Haroshi’s three-dimensional art piece is the wooden mosaic. In order to make a sculpture out of a thin skateboard deck, one must stack many layers. But skate decks are already processed products, and not flat like a piece of wood freshly cut out from a tree. Moreover, skateboards may seem like they’re all in the same shape, but actually, their structure varies according to the factory, brand, and popular skaters’ signature models. With his experience and almost crazy knowledge of skateboards, Haroshi is able to differentiate from thousands of used deck stocks, which deck fits with which when stacked. After the decks are chosen and stacked, they are cut, shaven, and polished with his favorite tools. By coincidence, this creative style of his is similar to the way traditional wooden Japanese Great Buddhas are built. 90% of Buddha statues in Japan are carved from wood, and built using the method of wooden mosaic; in order to save expense of materials, and also to minimize the weight of the statue. So this also goes hand in hand with Haroshi’s style of using skateboards as a means of recycling. Also, although one is not able to see from outside, there is a certain metal object that is buried inside his three-dimensional statue. The object is a broken skateboard part that was chosen from his collection of parts that became deteriorated and broke off from skateboards, or got damaged from a failed Big Make attempt. To Haroshi, to set this kind of metal part inside his art piece means to “give soul” to the statue. “Unkei,” a Japanese sculptor of Buddhas who was active in the 12th Century, whose works are most popular even today among the Japanese people; used to set a crystal ball called “Shin-Gachi-Rin (Heart Moon Circle)” in the position of the Buddha’s heart. This would become the soul of the statue. So the fact that Haroshi takes the same steps in his creation may be a natural reflection of his spirit and aesthetic as a Japanese

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Samples From The Lab

Rob Foote is an Illustrator from Cape Town, South Africa, who lived and worked in Japan for a number of years working for publishers AEON, Benesse and Pearson Longman.  Besides being a full time illustrator, he is currently working on a graphic novel/illustrated journal which is currently traveling around the world on the Sketchbook tour.  These are his brilliant animal/fruit sketches.

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